Emil writes for Game Informer

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Thumbing through the April issue of Game Informer (be on the lookout for the Alpha Protocol cover), I was pleasantly surprised to see Emil’s Op/Ed piece entitled, “A Question of Character.” I suppose I should have known it was in there, but it’s hard to be thinking about April when you’re still in March. Anyhow, within the editorial, Emil explains the challenges and importance of creating believable characters in RPGs. Here’s a quick sample:

“If we accept that all video game characters fall under one of three literary classifications — prototype, archetype, and stereotype — it’s easy to see the appeal of the archetype. This is the established, easily-understandable character model. The badass space marine or seductive sorceress. The prototype, while imaginative and interesting, is too easily viewed as ‘weird,’ and that means inaccessible. The stereotype? Overused, oversimplified, and more often than naught, offensive.”

Want more? Keep an eye out for the April issue of Game Informer.

Reader Comments

  1. Emil’s words are great! Much like a book, who wants dull characters that one can predict, and who wants people that are not REAL? Emil seems to get what a character should be, this gets me rather excited for FO3.

  2. “The prototype, while imaginative and interesting, is too easily viewed as ‘weird,’ and that means inaccessible.”

    So anything original is inaccessible? People get confused when not presented with stereotypes? Don’t you think that’s a little jaded, and kind of insulting to your fanbase? Perhaps a Better question would be how exactly Emil feels qualified to make that statement, all of the previous Bethesda games I have played have been jam packed with nothing but “archetypal” fantasy characters. What are some examples of original characters you guys have tried and had rejected?

    Not only am I amazed he said that, I am amazed you are actually quoting it here for all to see. It’s not a statement I would be proud of.

    PS: I’d view badass space marines and seductive sorceresses as stereotypes myself.

  3. [So anything original is inaccessible? People get confused when not presented with stereotypes? Don’t you think that’s a little jaded, and kind of insulting to your fanbase?

    Left by Rhett Butler on March 20th, 2008]

    You have to remember The Elder Scrolls is made to sell to as many people as possible not just the hardcore few. Then theres the fact that The Elder Scrolls have always had enough to enjoy the richness of stereotypes while giving the choice to create something original at the same time.

  4. i’ve always wanted to know what the point of physics powered deaths was, i mean, in the end, it’s all just dying!