Around the web: Todd takes the Hot Seat

todd-howard-20080618024529820.jpg

Interviews with Todd continue to roll in. Here’s two more for you to check out.

At IGN, Todd sat in their “Hot Seat” to answer burning questions — both gaming and non-gaming related. Here’s a sample:

IGN: Does your work say anything about you?

Todd Howard: That I’ve never really grown out of my love of the 100 hour adventures of my Apple 2 days. The ones I would go to bed dreaming about solving. I crave moments of discovery in games, the moments of “can I do this?” and the sense that I have found something no other player has. I want my games to have that. I want length and depth and hint books that can kill a child if dropped on them.

More stuff after the jump…

Moving along, on UK site The Guardian, Keith Stuart (who seems to be on a post-apocalyptic kick these days) interviewed Todd about Fallout 3. Here’s a quick look:

One thing we said on the blog recently is that a truly apocalyptic game can’t really have a positive aim, but your game seems to have a mission for the player which presumably has a ‘happy’ outcome. Do you feel that the traditional structure of adventure games – go through a series of challenges and ‘win’ at the end – is at odds with such a dark setting?
Our main themes are sacrifice and survival, and the game has several different endings, so all of them have some level of darkness in them. I love the ending of the game…love it.

In non-Todd news, I found this editorial discussing game AI at Kombo.com interesting. It only mentions Oblivion and Fallout 3 in passing, but it’s worth checking out.

Reader Comments

  1. Wow what an interview! Your in big trouble now Mr.Todd! :D

    Yea TERMINATOR: FUTURE SHOCK is stunning. Its like the Elder Scrolls of science fiction. I felt like i was actually in a world that had just gone through a nuclear holocaust cursed by terrifying humanoid machines stalking within the metal wreckage of desolate cities where the wind whispers death. A cold lonely place.

    [I want length and depth and hint books that can kill a child if dropped on them.]

    Oh my goodness! Theres gonna be child killing in FALLOUT 3! Theres the proof!

  2. “Howard has an impressive track record of pushing gaming into territory that few other designers would dare to go.”

    Erm, right. So why is Fallout 3 following the trends of today (first person shooter, heavy emphasis on action) rather than bucking the trends and striking out in a new direction like it’s predecessors?

  3. “I crave moments of discovery in games, the moments of “can I do this?” and the sense that I have found something no other player has. I want my games to have that. I want length and depth and hint books that can kill a child if dropped on them.”

    This is exactly what I was looking for in Oblivion – and didn’t find. There was no depth, no discovery. – bah ….

  4. [I think that’s just something to describe the weight of the hint books with? Anyway, looking forward to Fallout 3.

    Left by Indalus on June 19th, 2008]

    :D Yea i know ha ha. I was just exaggerating and distorting as am sure such a crazy funny interview might be by the straw grasping sensationalists.

  5. “Erm, right. So why is Fallout 3 following the trends of today (first person shooter, heavy emphasis on action) rather than bucking the trends and striking out in a new direction like it’s predecessors?” – Lingwei

    It’s not a first person shooter, it just lets you switch between views so you can play in first person if you want to. If it was a straight FPS you could say it wasn’t bucking any trends, but it’s not – so it is a non-standard style of gaming. It’s not a twitch game, and it is new territory as far as VATS etc. goes.

    They’re just making the very sensible decision to make something that’s familiar enough for most people to be able to hook into but at the same time will be different enough for a lot of fans of the previous games to enjoy. At least that’s my own take on it, but it seems obvious to me.

  6. Todd’s right that Terminator: Future Shock was under-appreciated by the rest of the world. I liked playing that game a lot. It’s sequel was bought as soon as it was available in Europe.