Wolfenstein 3D returns to PSN/XBLA

Before Wolfenstein: The New Order arrives in Q4 2013, turn back the clock to Wolfenstein 3D — the seminal first-person shooter from id Software — is back on Xbox LIVE and the North American PlayStation Store (PSN Europe is coming soon).

Taking the role of spy agent B.J. Blazkowicz (who returns as the hero in The New Order) and you must escape from Castle Wolfenstein and defeat the twisted Nazi regime! Fight all of the memorable enemies from Hans Grosse to Mecha-Hitler in the legendary game that launched the First Person Shooter genre. Search classic levels for hidden secrets that reveal stolen Nazi treasure, health packs, ammo and weapons, or even short cuts.

Wolfenstein 3D is available for $4.99 (PSN) and 400 Microsoft Points. Playing on PC? You can purchase the game on Steam, too.

 

Pre-E3 Roundup: The Elder Scrolls Online

The Evil Within. Wolfenstein: The New Order. Now… The Elder Scrolls Online.

Below is a sampling of online coverage for ESO from our recent Pre-E3 showing.

Game Front – “There was a palpable sense of danger, as if a trap door had opened up and dropped me into a very dangerous level of a dungeon I was exploring, and I had to fight my way back out to the safety of the open world.

It was the kind of moment that I play games for. ”

Game Informer – “As you can tell by my impressions here, [The] Elder Scrolls Online’s storytelling has left an impact on me. I was more impressed with this brief quest chain than I ever was in my hundreds of hours playing World of Warcraft. Star Wars: The Old Republic’s waning community proves that players need more that good storylines to keep them engaged with an MMO, but I’m hopeful for [The] Elder Scrolls Online.”

Ten Ton Hammer – “The concept of public dungeons isn’t new by any means, but it may seem so to today’s modern gamer. It’s been a very long time since we’ve seen their implementation and I can’t wait to see their return in The Elder Scrolls Online. There’s nothing like the thrill of being in a knock-down-drag-out fight to the death deep in the bowels of some horrific dungeon and seeing a friendly adventurer come around the corner at just the right moment to turn the tide of battle.”

Massively – “Here’s the part that intrigued me: At no point did the gameplay experience resemble an MMO. Sure, players weren’t allowed to run rampant through NPC houses to steal everything in sight, and questing was still limited to “gather such item” or “talk to NPC B because NPC A doesn’t feel like walking 10 feet” (those NPCs can be lazy!), but venturing out into the world felt natural, as if I were in any other Elder Scrolls title. The world is still populated with points of interest that actually generate interest.”

Want more? Check out the full roundup at ElderScrollsOnline.com

Legendary Q&A at Raptr.com

Outside of our office, there’s probably no one that knows the ins and outs of Skyrim better than David Hodgson — the co-author of the game’s official game guide. Today on Raptr.com, he’ll be answering questions about the game from 1-9 PM EST.

David’s latest work has been finalizing the Legendary Edition of the Skyrim Game Guide — available in original and collector’s edition flavors. We just received copies of the guide this week, and at over 1,100 pages, it’s a beast.

Pre-E3 Roundup: Hands-on with Wolfenstein: The New Order

This time around we look at previews (including hands-on impressions) and interviews for Wolfenstein: The New Order.

In CVG’s preview, featuring gameplay shown above, Andy Kelly describes the game as an “old school shooter first-person shotter with modern production values.”

Elsewhere at Eurogamer, Dan Whitehead discusses a tense, story-driven sequence shown to press. Here’s an excerpt:

“It’s a ridiculously camp scene, with kinky Nazi stereotypes right out of ‘Allo ‘Allo – but it’s also surprisingly tense, deliberately echoing the bar scene from Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds for the persistent fear that something horrible is about to happen. MachineGames uses the scene to show off its eye for detail – the coffee sloshes about in the cups as you move – and also its knack for first-person storytelling. Most notably, it’s a scene that leaves you feeling utterly powerless and vulnerable, an all-too-rare feat in the bullish FPS genre.”

For more on the game, check out our roundup below…

Digital Trends — “Wolfenstein: The New Order is a wild, loud, and unapologetic orgy of violence that harkens back to the tone of the original games while creating something new. It’s slightly twisted, challenging, and gives you a continual burst of instant gratification.”

Polygon — “There’s an over-the-top quality to BJ’s arsenal, his gruff action hero language and his ability to dispatch dozens of Nazi übersoldiers and their robot allies. MachineGames is not aiming for realism, Matthies says, preferring to skirt on the edge of believability.”

Game Informer – Feature from Tim Turi shares five things about ‘The New Order’ that make it stand out.

OXM UK – New interview with senior gameplay designer, Andreas Ojefors.

Digital Trends — “Wolfenstein: The New Order is a wild, loud, and unapologetic orgy of violence that harkens back to the tone of the original games while creating something new. It’s slightly twisted, challenging, and gives you a continual burst of instant gratification.”

Game Revolution — “In many regards, some of the retro Wolfenstein elements have been retained. The only numbers and pick-ups the player needs to worry about are for health, armor, and ammo reserves. Any health that goes over 100 gradually drains to Blazkowicz’s maximum health limit, which encourages players to use that temporary health boost in the name of well-timed aggression.”

Digital Spy — New interview with game director, Jens Matthies.

Strategy Informer — “The game feels slick and responsive, but it really is that tonal difference that makes it stand out. With its over-the-top attitude Wolfenstein may well be the perfect antidote to the shooter fatigue I and many others are suffering from…”

Gamer Horizon — Read a new interview with game director Jens Matthies, who discusses both the game and how the project was started. For more, read their hands-on preview.

Eurogamer — “There’s a lot crammed into the demo, from solid stealth to frantic gunfights, and while none of it is especially original, it is all presented with a comic-book flair and old-school energy that is rare in today’s shooter marketplace.”

Game Front –  ”It’s a powerful character moment, not only because of Engel and Bubi, who are intense and unpredictable in the same way as Hans Gruber in Die Hard, but because it seems to really rattle BJ. He’s human, after all.”

OXM UK — “The New Order isn’t only a firefight-a-palooza, though; segments where you’re tasked with creeping through air ducts and slicing through wire fences with a handy, upgradeable laser cutter help break up the nonstop action during our playthrough.”

Venture Beat — “I like what I’ve seen so far. The new Wolfenstein may be a test in the market. It raises the question, are first-person shooters simply in an endless cycle, where a developer can launch a new game with better graphics to satisfy fans? Or will the attempts to deliver an engaging story actually rope in a wider audience? So far, I’m intrigued by characters such as Frau Engel, who offer a lot of potential for the storytelling side of the game.”

Canadian Online Gamers — New interview with MachineGames.

VG247 — Watch their video feature, including gameplay and game director, Jens Matthies.

Pre-E3 Roundup: The Evil Within (Updated)

A couple weeks back, we held an event to highlight our 2013 E3 lineup: The Evil Within, The Elder Scrolls Online, and Wolfenstein: The New Order. Beginning today, you can start reading previews and interviews for all three games.

We begin with The Evil Within — our survival-horror game in development from our Japanese team, Tango Gameworks. In Kotaku’s preview for the game, Stephen Totilo writes:

“The Evil Within seems creepier, more dangerous, more old-school. It might as well be the Resident Evil 5 we didn’t get.”

For more on the game, check out impressions on these sites…

LA Times –  ”The imagery and atmospherics easily recall earlier installments in the “Resident Evil” series, as well as that other survival horror tentpole “Silent Hill” — the abandoned hospital location, the dismembered bodies, the blood-spattered walls hidden in shadow. Here, too, classical music emanates from a gramophone, while the sound of bug zappers and water dripping up the sense of timeless dislocation and foreboding mood.”

Game Revolution — “What translates most about The Evil Within is that it’s by far the best shot we have to seeing the (wonderfully evil) revival of the survival horror genre.”

Games.com — “… Evil Within approaches a more traditional survival horror design.”

Neoseeker –  ”I sat on the edge of my seat, I watched attentively, and yes, at times I was legitimately scared. The Evil Within is an experience to behold, that much is clear to me.”

Destructoid – “The sense of helplessness as you flee the chainsaw monster was thrilling, and oh so very creepy.”

AusGamers — “The game looks gorgeous. It has that Japanese horror feel we love with Western sensibilities built in. There’s a maturity to Mikami’s movement and horror design that beings his style into the new and, potentially, beyond. But most important of all is the greater sense of mystery.”

Polygon –  ”Tango Gameswork’s producer Masato Kimura said the game instills in the player a sense of uncertainty, and it is this ‘subtle, anxious, shapeless, unknowable sort of fear” that the game developers want to invoke.”

Game Informer — “While the base gameplay functions familiarly, the gore, mind games, and oppressive atmosphere have been ratcheted up.”

Eurogamer — “It’s certainly as pure as survival horror gets, with an emphasis on keeping the player vulnerable and outmatched, plus the obligatory side order of confusing mind games and grisly gross stuff.”

CVG — “The Evil Within is a welcome return to survival horror.”

GameZone — New interview with Masato Kimura.

VenureBeat — New preview and interview with producer Masato Kimura

OXM Online — “Though we hope Tango’s maiden voyage into survival-horror waters will pack more surprises than just the overly familiar peek-a-boo homages to scary games past, we jumped out of our seat more than once during the demo like frightened school kids.”

Gamer Horizon — “The graphics are fantastic, the atmosphere is tense and foreboding, and the moments in the asylum were genuinely tense and suspenseful. Coupled with the last moments of the demo, clearly Tango Gameworks is on the right track for making a truly horrific, and scary horror game.”

GameZone — “If you dig the horror genre or consider yourself a fan of Mikami’s work, this upcoming project is one worth keeping an eye on.”

NowGamer — New interview with Pete Hines and Jason Bergman.

Canadian Online Gamers — “Shut off the lights and pick yourself up a bulk sized package of Depends to prevent any unwanted messes and prepare for a terror fest.”

As new coverage surfaces, we’ll update the post. And get more updates on the game’s official Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Prepare for the morning

The best part of waking up… is Vault Boy in your cup!

A couple weeks back I caught this Kotaku post showcasing 3D Latte Art from Kazuki Yamamoto. Thoroughly impressed, I jokingly tweeted from @Fallout that we’d love to see a Vault Boy version.

Word must have gotten around as we’ve spotted a foam version of Vault Boy this week on Reddit, Twitter, and other social media sites.

Thanks Kazuki!