Around the web

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Here’s some interesting Fallout 3 coverage you can read up on over the weekend.

Reviews continue to hit the web. Today I spotted a new review at the New York post, where they gave the game an “A.” Here’s a snippet:

“The story is of course kind of tragic. But this is Fallout. And Fallout does not mess around. It tries very hard, and I think succeeds, in presenting you with a world where there is NO hope. Your job, depending on how you play the game, is to restore that hope. You can either be a beacon of humanity or a scourge.”

Elsewhere, you can read new reviews at Electric Playground, 360, Gay Gamer, Lazy Gamer, RPGamer, and the The Onion’s AV Club.

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Around the Web: Trophies, reviews, interviews, and a Golden Joystick

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Here’s some Fallout 3 related news from around the web that I thought you’d like to know about.

Pete answered Fallout 3-related questions today on EuroGamer. Included in the Q&A, Pete let PS3 gamers know that trophy support for the game will be implemented into the game (we’ll give you more details on this when we can). Head here to read the rest of the chat.

Last week at the Golden Joystick Awards, Fallout 3 won the Edge Most Wanted award.

Mike Snider at USA Today has a new article showcasing new releases with a focus on Fallout 3. Meanwhile, at MTV Mutliplayer, Patrick Klepek discusses how the game is consuming his time.

New reviews for Fallout 3 continue to hit. Here’s some of the latest ones to go up…

  • UGO’s Russ Frushtick grades the game an A+ in his review.
  • Scott Taves at MSNBC feels Fallout 3 is a “no-brainer for game of the year.
  • Gaming Trend gave the game the Michael Phelps’ treatment — awarding the game a Gold Medal in their review.
  • Stu Horvath has a review up for the New York Daily News.
  • Nick Chester of Destrutoid declares the gameplay experience of Fallout 3 “unmatched” in his review.

To read more reviews, head here.

Around the web: Reviews and more!

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Fallout 3 is now in stores worldwide, and in less than a week, there’s tons of reviews to read up on. Head here to check them out.

Before you start reading, you can also watch Xplay’s video review. They’ve also got a video showcasing the Collector’s Edition and Game Guide.

Moving along, GameSpy’s editorial staff has plenty of new Fallout 3-related articles to read. For those playing on 360, Will Tuttle has put together an achievement guide. Additionally, they’ve got five new editorials. Below is a snippet from Sterling McGarvey’s piece, Doing It All Wrong (And Loving) It: An Outsider’s View of Fallout 3:

“It’s actually a bit liberating to experience Fallout 3 without being caught up in the RPG conventions. The first one that I threw out the window against everyone’s advice was to specialize in specific areas. Deep down, I know I’m only padding the clock, since it’ll take a long time to get really good at anything instead of being great at a few things. Oh, and if there’s a level cap, then I’ve effectively shot myself in the foot.”

Moving along, you can check out a new interview with Todd on The Escapist Show. Over at Examiner.com, there’s an A to Z Guide to Fallout 3 worth reading. After reading Luke Plunkett’s blog at Kotaku, Saluting Fallout 3′s Beards, I wonder if that what “B” should have stood for beards.

Last but not least, head over to either GamerDNA and 360voice.com to enter their contests to win Fallout 3 schwag!

Around the web: Day-before-release edition

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We’re down to the final hours before the release of Fallout 3. If you’re waiting to pick up the game at midnight, here’s some coverage you can read to kill the time.

Mike Musgrove of the Washington Post has a new interview with Todd, as well as a feature about Fallout 3 titled, “Fallout 3, Starring Washington, D.C.,” which ran on the front page of their Business section yesterday. Here’s a snippet:

“Some Washington area game fans have been wondering whether they’ll be able to find their office or the buildings in their neighborhood in the game. Chances are, they might not. Bethesda Softworks executive producer Todd Howard says the studio didn’t seek to create a street-to-street level of verisimilitude. Instead, it tweaked the city’s map in a way that made sense for a video game’s pacing. He thinks people who know the area will periodically experience a more general ‘Hey, I know this view!’ feeling.”

A new interview with Lead Sound Designer Mark Lampert can be found over at GameSpy. Here’s a quick look at one of the questions:

GameSpy: What real-world weapons did you use to create the sounds of the ones in the game?

Mark Lampert: Quite a bit of the action on the game’s small arms (pistols, rifles, shotguns, etc.) is actually recorded from real firearms. A colleague kindly brought two pistols and three rifles over to my place where I could set up a couple of mics and record the sound of the bolt being opened and slammed shut, magazines sliding into place and being taken out, dry firing, etc. The actual sounds of the game’s weapons being fired were composited together from field recording libraries, as well a as little bit of Foley recording in places where I might want to add some extra bass or exaggerate the sound of the weapon’s action.

Elsewhere, you can read a new interview with Pete at Worth Playing, and Emil’s did an op/ed about violence for Edge.

Finally, at The Vault, there’s a new contest/scavenger hunt where you have a chance to win a copy of Fallout 3, as well as other Fallout-related schwag. Good luck!

Around the web: interviews, podcasts and more

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Here’s a load of new coverage for you to read up on before the release of Fallout 3 (T-minus 4 days!!!).

Russ Frushtick from UGO put up a new blog post covering the delivery of a Brotherhood of Steel statue arriving at their office. Having helped pack/unpack one of these, I can tell you, it’s quite the production.

New interviews with Emil can be found at both Gaming Nexus and GameSpy. Here’s a snippet of the latter, entitled The Art of Writing:

GameSpy: How much effort went into creating the main storyline versus encounters and characters found off the beaten path?

Emil Pagliarulo: I’d say it was a pretty equal division. I laid out the miscellaneous quests and the main quest at pretty much the same time. You know, we wanted to get everything on the table as soon as possible, for scheduling and practicality purposes as well as any creative reasons. But that was just the baseline. The other designers certainly fleshed out all that stuff throughout development, and things like the random encounter system came later, and really complimented the gameplay we already had.

Moving along, there’s a new interview with Todd at Paste magazine. Head here to read it.

For more news, hit the jump…

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Around the web: New Fallout 3 contest

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Here’s a few notable Fallout 3 mentions I thought you’d like to check out.

First, there’s a contest at Planet Fallout that you’ll want to enter. Entering their “End of World Sweeps” gives you a chance to win a plasma TV, an Area-51: Quad Core Flagship from Alienware, an Xbox 360, as well as some Fallout 3-related schwag. To enter, you must be at least 18 years of age and a US resident. You can read the rest of the contest rules here before entering.

Also at Planet Fallout, Blinzler continues his primer for Fallout 3 with new features on characters, places, and groups found within the game.

Click below for more news…

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Around the web

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Happy Monday to all! Found a few things I thought you’d like to check out.

Blinzler from Planet Fallout has a new feature to help prep folks for the release of Fallout 3. The series begins with Part 1: Creatures of the Wasteland.

In interview news, there’s a pair of new interviews worth reading. At GamaSutra, Todd talks about the process of creating Fallout 3, while Pete tackles questions at Big Download. Here’s a snippet from the former:

How does it feel, by the way, to have been making games for that period of time, and especially having one series that has existed for so long?

Todd: Well they take so long, so it’s not like we’ve made many games. It’s good. I mean, I think we’re lucky, in that the audience for what we do hasn’t gone away. It’s gotten bigger, if anything. It’s gotten a lot bigger. So, we’re fortunate that we can make those kinds of games that we want to play.

Finally, on GameTrailers, I found this video of the Frag Dolls interviewing Todd at PAX. Check out the embedded video below.

That’s all for now.

What we’re playing: Beta testing Sack Boy

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Last week I felt very lucky to be one of the few folks with a LittleBigPlanet beta key. While I created very little, I’ve had a blast playing the game. This week I’ve got company, as a few devs were able to track down a beta key. I can’t wait to see these guys come up with. Will Daryl create his next RenTest? He better get cracking, the beta ends this weekend.

Here’s the rundown of the other games we’re playing.

Daryl Brigner, Level Designer: Mount & Blade, Brothers in Arms: HH, and Little Big Planet Beta.

Larry Waldman, QA: LittleBigPlanet Beta (thanks Nghi), Fable 1.

Craig Lafferty: LittleBigPlanet Beta, Fallout 3.

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Around the Web

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Here’s the latest Fallout 3 coverage from around the internet.

Since our last update, Gus Mastrapa of Crispy Gamer has completed his hands-on preview trilogy. Click here for the cliffhanger, and here for his celebration with the Ewoks.

Also coming out of Pete’s trip out to San Fran — there’s a new preview from GamesRadar, as well as a new interview at GameRevolution. Here’s a snippet from the latter:

GameRevolution: Can you talk a little about the work and prep that went into rendering believable post-apocalyptic environs based in and near Washington, D.C?

Pete Hines: A lot of research went into figuring out what buildings in DC would have existed in the Fallout universe, since that world splits off from the world we know after WWII. So you’ll see landmarks you may recognize, and a number of things you won’t because they’re unique to the Fallout world. Our artists spent a lot of time figuring out how to incorporate the design influences of that period with the buildings they created so that it feels both familiar and slightly “off” at the same time.

To read the rest of Pete’s interview at GameRevolution, head here.