ESO Roundup

Last week we opened the doors of Oblivion to the plane of Coldharbour, the realm of Molag Bal; but even more events are happening within the ever growing world of ESO.

Play Testers Wanted

Over the years, we’ve gained valuable experience from player feedback, and now we’re ready to take it to the next level. Beginning this month, we’re opening our Bethesda Play Test Lab in Dallas, TX (stationed at idSoftware’s offices).

In the coming weeks and months, we’ll be kicking off our first play tests with folks that apply from our official website. Folks that apply will be able to play games before they release and even score some cool Bethesda swag.

We are looking for people of all skill levels who enjoy playing games. We’re interested in your feedback, whether you are a person that only plays games once in a while or the hardcore gamer that plays everything. If you’re over 18 and in or around the Dallas area, apply at playtest.bethsoft.com.

Interview: Skyrim Rocks

This week members of BGS pointed me to a fascinating read at Geo-HeritageScience — a blog from London resident, Jane Robb. With Bachelor and Master’s degrees in geology and years of work in the geoscience field (she current works  as a Communications Officer at Geology for Global Development), she definitely has a thing for rocks.

But she also enjoys spending free time playing videogames. During her adventures playing Skyrim, her passions collided, and she began to hypothesize about the location of specific rock deposits across the game’s regions. Here’s an excerpt from her post:

Here are the eight different kinds of rocks found in Skyrim. Not all of them are actually real however so the ones I will be discussing today are iron ore, gold ore, moonstone ore and malachite ore. Some notes: malachite is actually an ore in itself (of copper) and you do not get an ore of malachite; moonstone is a mineral and corundum is real (a mineral) but is found in Blackreach which is underground and cannot be shown on the Skyrim map.

“Here are the eight different kinds of rocks found in Skyrim. Not all of them are actually real however so the ones I will be discussing today are iron ore, gold ore, moonstone ore and malachite ore. Some notes: malachite is actually an ore in itself (of copper) and you do not get an ore of malachite; moonstone is a mineral and corundum is real (a mineral) but is found in Blackreach which is underground and cannot be shown on the Skyrim map”

Be sure to read the whole article at her blog, and then come back and check our our interview below. Modders should take particular notice!

How did you come to play Skyrim? Does your geology background factor into the games you choose to play?

I was initially introduced to the gaming world by my boyfriend several years ago as before I had never touched a console. I was instantly hooked. I mainly loved watching him play but then along came Oblivion. My boyfriend recommended it to me as he knew I loved fantasy (I read lots of fantasy novels and watch films) and I fell in love with the game. Needless to say I was then totally excited for Skyrim to come out, and completed the game and the first DLC in half the time it took him to play!

Continue reading full article ›

Dishonored community creations

The team at Arkane aren’t the only ones making fantastic Dishonored art with Zbrush. Over the past few weeks, we’ve seen some pretty impressive work from fans playing the game since October.

On Adam Fisher’s YouTube channel, watch an impressive time-lapse video as he creates Lord Pendleton. See more of Adam’s work at CGHub.com.

Elsewhere, check out these fantastic Dishonored tributes

  • @MaryKateClark is helping get the word out on characters captured on popular characters from the game
  • theomeganerd.tumblr.com showcases the recreation of Corvo’s mask used for a GamesRadar contest last Fall.
  • Kotaku highlights Nathan Proudloves’ LEGO tribute to Dunwall’s Tallboys. We’re crossing our fingers for a “to scale” version at LEGOLAND.
Have cool game-inspired art to share with us? Share it with us at bethblog@bethsoft.com.