Fallout in the Real World: The Real Action Abe??

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Over Valentine’s/President’s Day Weekend, one of our QA guys, Brent Krische, made a trip down to President’s Park in Williamsburg, VA — where he spotted this Abraham Lincoln doll.

Look familiar? Brent thought so, and wondered if it was an inspiration for the Action Abe figure in Fallout 3’s “Head of State” quest. After seeing both, I went to Action Abe’s creator, Artist Tony Greco, to see if the in-game figure was a tribute to this real-life doll. Here’s what he had to say…

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Around the Web: GOTD Edition

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It’s that time of the century again; the time when the usual “Game of the Year” lists are supplanted by even more daunting “Game of the Decade” lists.

Crispy Gamer is taking a sporty approach to it all, throwing many of the decade’s best games into a tournament bracket and letting fans vote to decide the winners of each round. Oblivion and Fallout 3 are both in the running for round two…head here to vote.

As for more traditional lists, the always-entertaining Onion A.V. Club included Fallout 3 in its picks for the 15 best games of the decade. Paste Magazine also found a place for both Oblivion and Fallout 3 in its “20 Best Games of the Decade” article.

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Web Roundup: Fallout 3

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Plenty of cool stuff I’ve found recently for Fallout 3. Read on…

On Twitter, I came across a link to a blog called The Adventures of Tobasco da Gama. In this post, our hero (we’ll call him the Lone Wanderer), discusses his plan to tour DC in a Vault Suit. A man of his word, check out the pics on Flickr.

Recently the 2009 MIXX awards were announced — celebrating creativity in interactive advertising. Among the award winners, Fallout 3 was awarded a Gold Award for Product Launch. Special thanks to AKQA (who also won an award for McDonalds and Flip Video) and everyone else that worked on the campaign.

At Planet Xbox 360, there’s a new list of the Top 10 Gaming Moments to Experience Before You Die. It’s a good list that points out how many great titles there have been this generation. Click here to find out what Fallout 3 moment made the list.

Ready to take on some Fallout trivia? The Escapist has two quizzes — in Heroic and Legendary flavors.

At Kotaku, Todd Howard was featured in a recent piece titled, “Is Single-Player Gaming In Danger Of Extinction?” — written by Michael McWhertor. Here’s a snippet from Todd:

“[Multiplayer is] the most requested feature we get,” says Todd Howard, executive producer of The Elder Scrolls series and Fallout 3 at Bethesda Softworks, so far resistant to the trend this generation. “So we do consider it every time… and every time it loses, but I suppose you never know.”

Moving on, I caught this pic from EPICponyz that you might recognize from here..:)

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To conclude this wrapup, here’s three videos to check out from YouTube. This one caught my eye because of the great work done on creating the BoS armor. Also be sure to check out this Fallout 3 Medley, and yet another fantastic fan video from Drakortha.

Fan-Made AER9 Laser Rifle

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This morning while drinking my daily glass of grape juice, I saw this blog post at Destructoid — depicting a fan-made Fallout 3 AER9 Laser Rifle. As my jaw dropped, I nearly spilled the grape juice all over myself and my laptop. Upon not destroying my laptop, I immediately sent the link to Pete, Todd, and others at the office.

The rifle was created by Harrison Krix (who also created an awesome  Bioshock Big Daddy), who is a self-proclaimed “27 year old dork working in Graphic Design and living in Atlanta.” Be sure to read more on how he assembled the rifle (complete with some step-by-step pictures) at his website.

Great work!

Games can be played outside, too

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Earlier this week, Kotaku Editor-in-Chief Brian Crecente put up a blog post about his Backyard Adaptations of Video Game Classics — that is, new ways to play outside, inspired by classic games (like Pac-Man and Super Mario Bros.) that normally keep you inside.

Motivated by Crecente’s post, our very own Fred Zeleny has created a few backyard adaptations of his own — focusing on recent titles Assassin’s Creed, Prince of Persia, and even Fallout 3. To learn how to play these, head to Fred’s blog or Kotaku.

Fallout in the Real World: Post-Nuclear LARPing

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Today I received numerous emails about a Fallout-based LARP (that’s live-action roleplay) that took place last month at a deserted Soviet military base near Leningrad, Russia. According to The Vault, the LARP, titled Fallout 2009: Nothing Personal, was set in the year 2257 (between Fallout 2 and Fallout 3).

Around 300 fans participated in the event. If you haven’t already, be sure to check out all the photos from the LARP here.

Thanks to Ausir and everyone else that emailed me about the event.

Amazing Brotherhood of Steel Costume

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This morning Istvan and Todd were raving about this Brotherhood of Steel costume —  showcased by Cosplay.com member Facing Costumes. Definitely one of the coolest BoS costumes we’ve seen yet — heck, it’s even got a mini-gun.

Check out more images of the costume here. And if you’ve got a costume you’ve worked on, email us at bethblog@bethsoft.com to share it.

Around the web

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Here’s a look at some online coverage from the past week…

Up on GamaSutra today, there’s a three-page interview with Pete Hines. Among other things, Pete discusses our partnership with Splash Damage and our DLC philosophy. Here’s a snippet of the latter:

As a developer of open-world games, I imagine there is some degree of creative restriction on what Bethesda can do with DLC, in that discrete content has to be integrated in some logical way. You can’t just add another racetrack to the menu, or whatever. How do you approach that?

Pete Hines: It is a constraint from one standpoint, which is that if you’re going to plug it into the existing world then it has to be adaptable for anybody at any level that we discern, at least for the first two [in Fallout 3]. We don’t discern whether you’re level 1, level 10, level 15, or level 20, so we have to allow for all of that.

But in general, no. We like building our games that way. Having the DLC exist within that world allows us to, once we’re done making all the content for the game and we’ve finished the game from that standpoint and then spent lot of time playing it, look for areas that we’d like to do more of — to do something different than when you’re looking at the whole spectrum of content you’ve provided.

More news after the break….

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