Skyrim Mods: Why We Gave It a Shot


Update: After discussion with Valve, and listening to our community, paid mods are being removed from Steam Workshop. Even though we had the best intentions, the feedback has been clear – this is not a feature you want. Your support means everything to us, and we hear you.

Original Post: We believe mod developers are just that: developers. We love that Valve has given new choice to the community in how they reward them, and want to pass that choice along to our players. We are listening and will make changes as necessary.

We have a long history with modding, dating back to 2002 with The Elder Scrolls Construction Set. It’s our belief that our games become something much more with the promise of making it your own. Even if you never try a mod, the idea you could do anything is at the core of our game experiences. Over the years we have met much resistance to the time and attention we put into making our games heavily moddable. The time and costs involved, plus the legal hurdles, haven’t made it easy. Modding is one of the reasons Oblivion was re-rated from T to M, costing us millions of dollars. While others in the industry went away from it, we pushed more toward it.

We are always looking for new ways to expand modding. Our friends at Valve share many of the same beliefs in mods and created the Steam Workshop with us in 2012 for Skyrim, making it easier than ever to search and download mods. Along with Skyrim Nexus and other sites, our players have many great ways to get mods.

Despite all that, it’s still too small in our eyes. Only 8% of the Skyrim audience has ever used a mod. Less than 1% has ever made one.

In our early discussions regarding Workshop with Valve, they presented data showing the effect paid user content has had on their games, their players, and their modders. All of it hugely positive. They showed, quite clearly, that allowing content creators to make money increased the quality and choice that players had. They asked if we would consider doing the same.

This was in 2012 and we had many questions, but only one demand. It had to be open, not curated like the current models. At every step along the way with mods, we have had many opportunities to step in and control things, and decided not to. We wanted to let our players decide what is good, bad, right, and wrong. We will not pass judgment on what they do. We’re even careful about highlighting a modder on this blog for that very reason.

Three years later and Valve has finally solved the technical and legal hurdles to make such a thing possible, and they should be celebrated for it. It wasn’t easy. They are not forcing us, or any other game, to do it. They are opening a powerful new choice for everyone.

We believe most mods should be free. But we also believe our community wants to reward the very best creators, and that they deserve to be rewarded. We believe the best should be paid for their work and treated like the game developers they are. But again, we don’t think it’s right for us to decide who those creators are or what they create.

We also don’t think we should tell the developer what to charge. That is their decision, and it’s up to the players to decide if that is a good value. We’ve been down similar paths with our own work, and much of this gives us déjà vu from when we made the first DLC: Horse Armor. Horse Armor gave us a start into something new, and it led to us giving better and better value to our players with DLC like Shivering Isles, Point Lookout, Dragonborn and more. We hope modders will do the same.

Opening up a market like this is full of problems. They are all the same problems every software developer faces (support, theft, etc.), and the solutions are the same. Valve has done a great job addressing those, but there will be new ones, and we’re confident those will get solved over time also. If the system shows that it needs curation, we’ll consider it, but we believe that should be a last resort.

There are certainly other ways of supporting modders, through donations and other options. We are in favor of all of them. One doesn’t replace another, and we want the choice to be the community’s. Yet, in just one day, a popular mod developer made more on the Skyrim paid workshop than he made in all the years he asked for donations.

Revenue Sharing

Many have questioned the split of the revenue, and we agree this is where it gets debatable. We’re not suggesting it’s perfect, but we can tell you how it was arrived at.

First Valve gets 30%. This is standard across all digital distributions services and we think Valve deserves this. No debate for us there.

The remaining is split 25% to the modder and 45% to us. We ultimately decide this percentage, not Valve.

Is this the right split? There are valid arguments for it being more, less, or the same. It is the current industry standard, having been successful in both paid and free games. After much consultation and research with Valve, we decided it’s the best place to start.

This is not some money grabbing scheme by us. Even this weekend, when Skyrim was free for all, mod sales represented less than 1% of our Steam revenue.

The percentage conversation is about assigning value in a business relationship. How do we value an open IP license? The active player base and built in audience? The extra years making the game open and developing tools? The original game that gets modded? Even now, at 25% and early sales data, we’re looking at some modders making more money than the studio members whose content is being edited.

We also look outside at how open IP licenses work, with things like Amazon’s Kindle Worlds, where you can publish fan fiction and get about 15-25%, but that’s only an IP license, no content or tools.

The 25% cut has been operating on Steam successfully for years, and it’s currently our best data point. More games are coming to Paid Mods on Steam soon, and many will be at 25%, and many won’t. We’ll figure out over time what feels right for us and our community. If it needs to change, we’ll change it.

The Larger Issue of the Gaming Community and Modding

This is where we are listening, and concerned, the most. Despite seeming to sit outside the community, we are part of it. It is who we are. We don’t come to work, leave and then ‘turn off’. We completely understand the potential long-term implications allowing paid mods could mean. We think most of them are good. Some of them are not good. Some of them could hurt what we have spent so long building. We have just as much invested in it as our players.

Some are concerned that this whole thing is leading to a world where mods are tied to one system, DRM’d and not allowed to be freely accessed. That is the exact opposite of what we stand for. Not only do we want more mods, easier to access, we’re anti-DRM as far as we can be. Most people don’t know, but our very own Skyrim DLC has zero DRM. We shipped Oblivion with no DRM because we didn’t like how it affected the game.

There are things we can control, and things we can’t. Our belief still stands that our community knows best, and they will decide how modding should work. We think it’s important to offer choice where there hasn’t been before.

We will do whatever we need to do to keep our community and our games as healthy as possible. We hope you will do the same.

Bethesda Game Studios

Skyrim Weekend: You Can’t Beat Free


To coincide with the newly announced updates to the Skyrim Workshop, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is going to be more accessible than ever. Freely accessible!

If you don’t already own Skyrim, between now(4/23/15 @ 1pm EST) and Monday at 1pm EST, you’ll be able to download and play the base version of Skyrim as much as you want for free. You can even download free mods from the Workshop to enhance your experience.

On top of being able to play for free, this weekend we’ve got some pretty big savings on all content for Skyrim. Deals include:

  • Skyrim Legendary Edition – 66% off/$39.99 or $13.60
  • Skyrim Main Game 75% off/$19.99 or $5
  • Dawnguard 62.5% off/$19.99 or $7.50
  • Dragonborn 62.5% off/$19.99 or $7.50
  • Hearthfire 50% off/$4.99 or $2.50

Note: To be able to access paid mods, you will need to own a copy of Skyrim.

Skyrim Workshop Now Supports Paid Mods


We’ve had a long and excellent relationship with our good friends at Valve. We worked together to make the Workshop a huge part of Skyrim, and we’re excited that something we’ve been working together on for a long time is finally happening. You can now charge for the mods you create.

Unlike other curated games on Steam that allow users to sell their creations, this will be the first game with an open market. It will not be curated by us or Valve. It was essential to us that our fans decide what they want to create, what they want to download, and what they want to charge.

Many of our fans have been modding our games since Morrowind, for over 10 years. They now have the opportunity to earn money doing what they love – and all fans have a new way to support their favorite mod authors. We’ve also updated Skyrim and the Creation Kit with new features to help support paid mods including the ability to upload master files, adding more categories and removing filesize limit restrictions.

What does this mean for you?

As a modder, you now have the option of listing your creations at a price determined by you. Or, you can continue to share your projects for free. For those shopping for new mods, Valve is making sure you can try any mod risk free.

For full details on these changes to the Skyrim Workshop, check out Steam’s announcement page and FAQ.

Modding has been important to all our games for such a long time. We try to create worlds that come alive and you can make your own, but it’s in modding where it truly does. Thanks again for all your incredible support over the years. We hope steps like this breathe new life into Skyrim for everyone.

Bethesda Game Studios

Top 5 Skyrim Mods of the Week… LIVE in London


Ever wanted to see how a top internet show like Gamespot’s Top 5 Skyrim Mods of the Week is made? Ever wanted to be there while they film it?

Then this is your chance to join hosts Seb and Cam and star Kevin VanNord for Top 5 Skyrim Mods of the Week… Live! Taking place in London’s videogame-themed Loading Bar on March 7th, attendees can look forward to drinks and spot-prizes, but hurry as there are only an extremely limited number of tickets for sale here  (note, you must be 18 or over to attend).

And if you can’t make it, take heart, because Gamespot wants you to choose Kevin VanNord’s companion for the special show. So do you think Kevin should adventure with:

  • Chatty, opinionated Khajiit Inigo?
  • The mighty force of nature that is Dovahbear?
  • Fiery mount and danger to stables everywhere, the Blaze of Evantide?

PC Modding Interview – SURE AI

This week we’re talking to Johannes and Nicolas of the Sure AI modding team. Serving as the project lead and creative director, respectively, the duo from Munich are currently hard at work on their Skyrim total conversion mod, Enderal — one that last year captured’s Best Upcoming Mod award.

If Sure AI ( sounds familiar — we’ve also highlighted them for their Fallout 3 project, Cube Experimental, as well as their Oblivion project, Nehrim

Read our interview with them below…

The Creation Kit toolset released back nearly three years ago (Feb 2012). How much “kicking the tires” did SureAI do before planning Enderal?

Johannes: Pretty much no kicking at all – we started planning Enderal — the scope, drafts of story and gameplay, a rough production plan, as good as it was possible without knowing the capacities of the CK — in October 2011, a month before Skyrim was released. Of course, the first results we got in the new engine weren’t that presentable and had to be reworked, but the actual development of Enderal started as soon as the Creation Kit was released.

How many folks are working on Enderal?

Nicolas: Altogether, we’re 14 people on the core team, of which around eight spend a lot of time on the development. Then, there are a lot of external contributors, mainly 3d artists, and, of course, voice actors and a German recording studio, 2day Productions, who help us with the localization.

Continue reading full article ›

Bethesda TwitchWorks: Glory and Goats in Skyrim

IMG_1275We’re going live with Skyrim once more for our new TwitchWorks episode. Our Northern Overlord dark elf, Alabaster is not finished with his romps through the chill lands just yet. This time we’re trying out some new mods including one that turns him into a goat!

Join Alabaster and us once more as we adventure onward in Skyrim – happening tomorrow (that’s Friday 1/23) at 4pm EST only on Twitch.TV/Bethesda.

Modding Interview – Beyond Skyrim

We’re starting the new year with a all-new Skyrim modding interview. This time around we’re talking to Will Hillson, part of the Dark Creations team. A post-grad student in the UK, Will is an integral part of DC’s ambitious project known as “Beyond Skyrim”.

What’s the mod all about? Find out below…

Can you give a general overview of Beyond Skyrim and where the mod project currently stands?

Beyond Skyrim is a series of interlinking mods which will ultimately allow players to visit other areas of Tamriel within the Skyrim engine. Assets for each new region are being painstakingly created from scratch, including architecture, creatures, weapons, landscapes, textures and objects created by our artists and modelers. We pride ourselves on our fidelity to Elder Scrolls lore, and our ultimate aim is to create a player experience which will fit together seamlessly with Skyrim itself, allowing players to continue their existing character’s adventures in other lands, or perhaps even sidestep Skyrim’s story  entirely and experience what the rest of Tamriel has to offer.

Continue reading full article ›

Thrilling Skyrim Coverage

 The weekend’s here. Before you get going with your weekend gaming, here’s some Skyrim stories, videos, and more to catch up on…

    • Dead End Thrills is leaving the the world of Skyrim behind, but you can still check out some of Duncan Harris’ greatest Skyrim screens, including the one shown above..
    • The lead author of Prima’s Game Guide for Skyrim, David Hodgson, blogs about the release of the Revised & Expanded Game Guide.
    • IGN has put together their Top 100 RPGs of All Time List. Visit the site to see where Skyrim, Morrowind, and Oblivion rated.
    • At the Gameological Society, the Elder Scrolls’ Wabbajack takes on Fallout’s Luck Bobblehead in the Best Treasure Ever tournament final. If you’re torn on which to vote for, this video might help.
    • Gamespot’s latest Skyrim Modding video highlights an ability that pays homage to Dishonored’s Blink ability. Watch it below.

Finally, be sure to check out to see amazing 360 degree time-lapse videos of the game’s world. Really cool stuff!

Skyrim Workshop: Mod #10,000

This past week the Skyrim Workshop reached another milestone – it’s 10,000th mod. Learn more about the mod, Shannara Weapon Set from joedamarsio, in  an interview from the Skyrim Creation Kit (Public) Steam Group. Here’s an snippet…

Any advice you would offer to anyone playing Skyrim who maybe thinks about trying to make a mod but is intimidated?

It’s overwhelming when you first look at all the options on the Creation Kit but if you follow the Wiki it will talk you through everything and make modding a pleasurable and fun experience

Read the full interview here, and if you haven’t checked out the Workshop yet, visit

Cars in Skyrim?!?

Gamespot’s latest look Skyrim Mods brings the zany — squeaky toys, a tribute to Mortak Kombat’s Scorpion, and old clunkers to drive around. Watch the video above to learn about these mods…