New Beta Update available on Steam (Update)

Update 2/23: A new version of the Beta Update, 1.4.27, is now live. It adds the following change:

  • Followers now sneak properly when player is sneaking.

Original Post: Today on Steam we’ve uploaded a new Beta Update (1.4.26) highlighted by some tweaks modders have requested for the Skyrim Workshop.

Reminder: This patch is still in development. Apply the update at your own risk and only if you are affected by issues outlines below.

UPDATE 1.4.26

LAUNCHER

  • Fixed issue with downloading mods when you are subscribed to more than 50 mods
  • Fixed crash when loading a subscribed mod that has been removed from Workshop by the author
  • Mod load order functionality

BUG FIXES (PC only)

  • Fixed occasional crashes when loading a save that relies on plugins/master files that no longer exist
  • Fixed issue where controls would become unresponsive while charging an enchanted weapon
  • Fixed issue where controls would occasionally become unresponsive while switching from third to first person while using the Arcane Enchanter
  • Fixed issue where controls would become unresponsive if activating a crafting station with autorun active
  • Fixed issue where keyboard would fail if Rename Item was selected before choosing the number of charges, while using Arcane Enchanter
  • Fixed several issues with remapping buttons while using an Xbox 360 controller
  • Fixed issue where pressing Escape button after fast traveling but before the loading would cause certain menus to stop working properly

If you opt into the Beta, be sure to back up your saved games or simply be careful not to overwrite your existing saves. If you decide to opt out of the beta program, your old saves will still work with the current release of Skyrim (v 1.4).

As a reminder, to get the beta, you need to do the following:

  1. Log into Steam
  2. Click on Steam in the upper menu
  3. Select Settings
  4. Under the Account tab, go to the Beta Participation section and select Change.
  5. A drop down menu will appear. Select Skyrim Beta.
  6. Select OK.
  7. Steam will now restart. After Steam restarts, Skyrim will be updated to the Beta version currently available.

If you decide you don’t want to run the Beta anymore, redo steps 1 – 4. At the drop down, select NONE – Opt out of all beta programs. Let Steam restart, and Skyrim will automatically update itself back to the latest released version.

To provide feedback on the beta update, use our beta forum.

New Creation Kit Tutorial videos (Updated)

Update: Episode 7, covering traps, is now up.

Watch the sixth episode of our Creation Kit tutorial series as level designer Daryl Brigner demonstrates how to place enemy actors in the world and design their patrols.

Missed an earlier episode? Visit our BGS YouTube Channel and learn more.

Episode 1: Introduction to the Kit
Episode 2: Basic Layout
Episode 3: Basic Layout II
Episode 4: Clutter
Episode 5: Navmesh
Episode 6: Basic Encounters
Episode 7: Traps

Spending more time downloading mods than making them? The team at Valve has added new Workshop features, including a search function. If there’s more features you’d like to see, share your feedback in our Creation Kit forumsValve’s dedicated Workshop forums, or in the comments below.

Skyrim just got even bigger

Ready to start using the Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop? Bethesda Game Studios level designer Joel Burgess gets you ready below…

When we created Skyrim, we set out to make the largest, most engrossing role-playing game we had ever attempted. Now it’s about to get a whole lot bigger, thanks to our amazing modding community.

Mod-makers have a long history with Bethesda Game Studios, bringing to life new quests, locations and characters, as well as making changes to game from subtle tweaks to full-blown overhauls. With the Creation Kit, the same tool we used to create Skyrim, there’s almost no limit to what can be accomplished – and we’re putting that power in your hands.

Best of all, access to the Skyrim Workshop and Creation Kit is free for anybody with a Steam account and a copy of Skyrim.

With the Skyrim Workshop, finding and installing your favorite mods is easier than ever before. Mod-makers will also enjoy a streamlined process for uploading mods directly to Steam.

Continue reading full article ›

Happy Modding Day! Creation Kit, Skyrim Workshop, High-Res Texture Pack released!

Modders rejoice! We’re pleased to announce that the Skyrim Creation Kit is now available!

With the Creation Kit’s release, fans can now upload, download, and install custom content through the Skyrim Workshop on Steam. Get a crash course by reading level designer Joel Burgess’ blog post, and be sure to read up on our list of best practices for modding. Need more help? Don’t forget to to check out the official Wiki at www.CreationKit.com. In the coming days and weeks, we’ll be sharing tutorial videos for beginners and experts alike. Check out the first tutorial above, and visit the Bethesda Game Studios YouTube Channel for more.

In addition to releasing the Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop, today we’re allowing players to experience Skyrim as you’ve never seen it before with the Skyrim High-Resolution Texture Pack. Before downloading it from Steam, make sure your system requirements exceed Skyrim’s recommended specs before attempting to install, including Windows Vista/7, a minimum of 4GB of system RAM, and a DirectX 9.0c compatible NVIDIA or AMD ATI video card with at least 1 GB of RAM and the latest drivers.

First Look: Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop (Updated)

Update:

The Creation Kit is on track for release on Tuesday!

The Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop (mods.elderscrolls.com) are nearly here! To get PC players ready for its release, watch our preview video and check out a new diary from Production Director Ashley Cheng.

Here’s Ash…

With each game we release — Morrowind, Oblivion, Fallout 3, and now Skyrim — modders continue to use our worlds as a canvas to build the most incredibly creative and fun mods in gaming. The fact that Morrowind’s modding community is still going strong 10 years after its release is a testament to how essential our community is to the success of our games.

We’re big believers that if we go the extra mile and make our games as moddable as possible, the game will only be better for it. So the gameplay of “do whatever you want” extends to “make the game do whatever you want.” As we were building Skyrim and its tools, we made it a goal to try and keep the transition from our previous titles to Skyrim as smooth as possible for modders. More importantly, we want to make it easier for more people to enjoy mods. So we teamed up with Valve and created the Skyrim Workshop. We couldn’t be more pleased with how it’s turning out. Mods are a big part of what makes our games special, so we urge everyone to try it out. We’re going to keep looking for ways to get mods to more people, and hopefully one day to our console audience.

With Skyrim Workshop, you can browse and search for the latest or highest rated mods, subscribe to any that interest you, rate your favorites and post feedback. Once you’ve subscribed to some mods, start the Skyrim launcher and you’ll see your subscribed mods automatically download. The launcher will even check if a mod has been updated and grab the latest version.

If you want to try making mods (and we think everybody should), the Creation Kit will be a free download via Steam under Tools. The Creation Kit has lots of new features, including the ability to build archives. Plus you’ll want to check out the Creation Kit Wiki, our online documentation and help file, for more details.

Of course, you’ll still be able to use popular fan-hosted mod sites like Skyrim Nexus to find great mods to play. We did not change any functionality to exclude the way mods worked previously. We even added a few features to help out — for instance, custom INI files can now be packaged into mods so you don’t need to backup your INI files anymore.

And we’re not done. Neither is Valve. Give us your feedback on the Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop in our forums. We both have updates in the works, so give us your thoughts.

Big thanks to programmers Ken Cockerham, Mike Lipari, and Shannon Bailey for getting the Skyrim Workshop up and running with Skyrim. And special kudos to Joel Burgess (who originally brought up the idea of using Steam Workshop) for shepherding this process along the way.

We’d also like to give big shout outs to Valve. We are all big Valve fan boys. Thanks to David Sawyer, Josh Weier, Pieter Wycoff, Kurtis Chinn, Tom Bui, Alden Kroll and Jason Holtman.

Finally, we’d like to thank all the modders who volunteered to beta test the Creation Kit and Skyrim Workshop. Your feedback has been invaluable.

We can’t wait to see your work!